Toru's TESOL Life

My Reflective Thought on TESOL-related Lecture,Books,and Articles. Also, Useful Information Links. This blog stops posting new articles now. My current blog is as follows. This blog is mainly on thought about my teaching days and private life. http://olympicsmemorial.blogspot.com/

Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Get a feeling for a language!

The lecturer, Dr.C, in the class of Applied Linguistcs speaks and writes a lot about how we quickly can acquire our target languages. He researches it from the perspectives of pragmatics and psychology, and neuro-science. Though i had never though about the topic deeply, and i am no knowledge of the three perspectives, what he speaks and writes is really intriguing!

He said what learners grasp is not the traditional four skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing), but a sort of language feeling. He seems to try a way for leanrers to get that feeling where they can easily in a mood of the world where the target languages are dinamically used. Moreover, once they get a feeling, it is likely to occur a transfer from the one mode like reading to other mode like listening.

I remembered my experience as a learner of my target language, English. I practiced speaking when i was in a conversational school, and i felt i was really motivated to learn English, because i could get a feeling of the language, in restrospect. I practiced speaking skill, but at the same time, I passed along the way to get close and close to a kind of core of English, which are surrounded by the four skills.

He writes about various cases of people who can speak other languages they hardly use in their daily lives, like people whose both brain hemispheres are the same size(most of people has larger left-brain than right one according to Dr.C), those who can seem to recall and speak other languages they almost never uses, believed by some as raincarneted soul, and those who can "use" other-self speaking other languages they never use, to handle severe situation, called dissociative identity disorder(DID), also called Tajujinkaku in Japan. Though the his research seems to scratch the surrounding, and core has not yet been clear, his articles, comments, and lecture give me lots of insight, and make me think seriously about how i should change my perspectives of English learning and teaching.

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